Sarah Wrote That

tesslynch:

My favorite living artist, Canadian painter Alex Colville, is no longer living. I have a couple of his prints, and sometimes when I’m stumped with writing or just feeling blue I’ll stare at them like they’re pretty Ouija boards to see if they offer me any clues. They usually do.
Pouring out a tube of cyan for my homie today.

A section of this accompanied one of my favorite Alice Munro stories, 1997’s "The Children Stay."

tesslynch:

My favorite living artist, Canadian painter Alex Colville, is no longer living. I have a couple of his prints, and sometimes when I’m stumped with writing or just feeling blue I’ll stare at them like they’re pretty Ouija boards to see if they offer me any clues. They usually do.

Pouring out a tube of cyan for my homie today.

A section of this accompanied one of my favorite Alice Munro stories, 1997’s "The Children Stay."

Some Thoughts On Narration, Point of View, And Novels I’ve Liked Recently

image

Nadine Gordimer’s Paris Review interview has gotten me reading Burger’s Daughter, my first, long overdue encounter with the novels of what J.M. Coetzee calls her “major phase”. More than anything I’ve read so far this year I can feel it changing my sense of possibilities in fictional space (fitting that as I was opening the mailer it arrived in from Powell’s, an Amazon promo chimed into my junk folder).

Read on →
brightwalldarkroom:

ISSUE #2 OF BRIGHT WALL/DARK ROOM IS NOW AVAILABLE!
Featuring brand new essays from Amelia Gray, Matt Patches, Elizabeth Cantwell, Stephen Sparks, Sarah Malone, Letitia Trent, Sara Gray, and Andrew Root, as well as eight new and original illustrations by artist Brianna Ashby!








“Issue #2 is all about entering strange and unfamiliar worlds, a swan dive into the surreal. In the nine featured essays, you’ll visit many places: dilapidated hotel rooms, ancient Roman battlefields, a monastery built on top of an island in France, a dream-like version of New York City at night (shot on a giant soundstage in London), Sgt. Nicholas Brody’s refrigerator, The 2013 Cannes Film Festival, a trailer in an empty field surrounded by expensive and loud stereo equipment, an all-girls boarding school at the turn of the 20th century, and a portal that leads directly into John Malkovich’s brain… 
Get ready to get weird.” 








Click here to download and/or subscribe to BW/DR directly from your iPhone or iPad. You’ll be charged $1.99 per month through the iTunes store, and immediately receive access to this new issue, plus last month’s inaugural issue. 

I’m so pleased to be part of this, and grateful to Chad, Elizabeth, and Michelle for their insightful editing, here and through the years.

brightwalldarkroom:

ISSUE #2 OF BRIGHT WALL/DARK ROOM IS NOW AVAILABLE!

Featuring brand new essays from Amelia Gray, Matt Patches, Elizabeth Cantwell, Stephen Sparks, Sarah Malone, Letitia Trent, Sara Gray, and Andrew Root, as well as eight new and original illustrations by artist Brianna Ashby!

Issue #2 is all about entering strange and unfamiliar worlds, a swan dive into the surreal. In the nine featured essays, you’ll visit many places: dilapidated hotel rooms, ancient Roman battlefields, a monastery built on top of an island in France, a dream-like version of New York City at night (shot on a giant soundstage in London), Sgt. Nicholas Brody’s refrigerator, The 2013 Cannes Film Festival, a trailer in an empty field surrounded by expensive and loud stereo equipment, an all-girls boarding school at the turn of the 20th century, and a portal that leads directly into John Malkovich’s brain… 

Get ready to get weird.” 

Click here to download and/or subscribe to BW/DR directly from your iPhone or iPad. You’ll be charged $1.99 per month through the iTunes store, and immediately receive access to this new issue, plus last month’s inaugural issue. 

I’m so pleased to be part of this, and grateful to Chad, Elizabeth, and Michelle for their insightful editing, here and through the years.

Novel revisions. I’ve been thinking about the photo of half-finished Grand Central Terminal that was recently on the Tumblr radar, the façade already clad in stone, the lower tracks and platforms and the loop for trains to turn around on still exposed, and how the terminal’s circulatory system justified the expense, indeed the existence of the façade and concourse. The second half of my manuscript is color-coded with edits, mine in red, my thesis committee’s in blue and green, but it’s looking over the first half where the tracks are covered over, the new text unmarked, that I fret: does it work?

Read on →
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Storm after storm today.

Storm after storm today.

"The average reader is pleased to observe anybody’s wooden leg being stolen."

- Flannery O’Connor, with what continues to strike me as an incredibly succinct and useful piece of plot advice. (via mttbll) The entire essay ("Writing Short Stories," collected in Mystery and Manners), is the most refreshing tonic.
sundoglit:

Issue Three | May 2013

We bring you Issue Three of Sundog Lit. This is a really great issue, and we’re so proud…

Read on →

I’m so pleased to have a poem, "Sugaring," in this beautiful issue:

In one state I was born knowing how to nest potted in small duties in a crooked porch town I grew buttoned against the wind

sundoglit:

Issue Three | May 2013

We bring you Issue Three of Sundog Lit. This is a really great issue, and we’re so proud…

Read on →

I’m so pleased to have a poem, "Sugaring," in this beautiful issue:

In one state I was born knowing how to nest
potted in small duties
in a crooked porch town
I grew buttoned against the wind

kateoplis:

5th Ave, 1905

So awesome. For once, the Flatiron from the South, Madison Square Park angling in above it. Kind of feel I lost some sort of cred, how long I took to recognize it.

kateoplis:

5th Ave, 1905

So awesome. For once, the Flatiron from the South, Madison Square Park angling in above it. Kind of feel I lost some sort of cred, how long I took to recognize it.

A Letter to Young Writers: After Mary Ruefle’s “Remarks on Letters”

katepetersen:

Last night, I taught my last class as a graduate instructor at the University of Minnesota. I had struggled with how to end class—how to tell them what I wanted them to know—and I told them so.

We sat in a circle as evening came on, on a lawn that had been under snow as late as last week. This is a rough transcript of the letter I read them. (feel free to share with attribution, and please note I quote from Mary Ruefle’s “Remarks on Letters.” Big debts to my teacher Charles Baxter, as well, for his good thoughts on stories.)

This is wonderful.