Sarah Wrote That

tesslynch:

My favorite living artist, Canadian painter Alex Colville, is no longer living. I have a couple of his prints, and sometimes when I’m stumped with writing or just feeling blue I’ll stare at them like they’re pretty Ouija boards to see if they offer me any clues. They usually do.
Pouring out a tube of cyan for my homie today.

A section of this accompanied one of my favorite Alice Munro stories, 1997’s "The Children Stay."

tesslynch:

My favorite living artist, Canadian painter Alex Colville, is no longer living. I have a couple of his prints, and sometimes when I’m stumped with writing or just feeling blue I’ll stare at them like they’re pretty Ouija boards to see if they offer me any clues. They usually do.

Pouring out a tube of cyan for my homie today.

A section of this accompanied one of my favorite Alice Munro stories, 1997’s "The Children Stay."

New Yorker ads [hi-res] accompanying Pauline Kael’s 1969 review of Ken Russell’s Women in Love, in the last years of the pre-area code New York telephone exchanges.

New Yorker ads [hi-res] accompanying Pauline Kael’s 1969 review of Ken Russell’s Women in Love, in the last years of the pre-area code New York telephone exchanges.

Mira Bartók—writer, artist, alum of my program at UMass, generous friend and above-and-beyond citizen of the lit and arts community—has won this year’s National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography for The Memory Palace:

a book that rose to the formal challenge of blending her mother’s journals, reflections on her mother’s mental illness and subsequent homelessness, and thoughts on her own recovery from a head injury to create a heartfelt yet respectful work of art.

I published an excerpt in Issue 2 of Route 9:

A homeless woman, let’s call her my mother for now, or yours, sits on a window ledge in late afternoon in a working class neighborhood in Cleveland, or it could be Baltimore or Detroit. She is five stories up and below the ambulance is waiting, red lights flashing in the rain.
Read On →

[painting: Mira Bartók]

Mira Bartók—writer, artist, alum of my program at UMass, generous friend and above-and-beyond citizen of the lit and arts community—has won this year’s National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography for The Memory Palace:

a book that rose to the formal challenge of blending her mother’s journals, reflections on her mother’s mental illness and subsequent homelessness, and thoughts on her own recovery from a head injury to create a heartfelt yet respectful work of art.

I published an excerpt in Issue 2 of Route 9:

A homeless woman, let’s call her my mother for now, or yours, sits on a window ledge in late afternoon in a working class neighborhood in Cleveland, or it could be Baltimore or Detroit. She is five stories up and below the ambulance is waiting, red lights flashing in the rain.

Read On →

[painting: Mira Bartók]

elliottholt:

This is a Soviet poster from 1932 dedicated to International Women’s Day. The red text reads: The 8th of March: A day of rebellion by working women against kitchen slavery.The grey text in lower right reads: Down with the oppression and vacuity of household work!
In Russia (where I lived for two years), International Women’s Day was marked the way Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the States. Men bought flowers for women. I worked in an ad agency, where the director presented—there was a ceremony of sorts— flowers to every woman in the office. It was the one day of the year when Russian women were allowed to put their feet up, when their husbands did some of the housework.

elliottholt:

This is a Soviet poster from 1932 dedicated to International Women’s Day. The red text reads: The 8th of March: A day of rebellion by working women against kitchen slavery.The grey text in lower right reads: Down with the oppression and vacuity of household work!

In Russia (where I lived for two years), International Women’s Day was marked the way Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the States. Men bought flowers for women. I worked in an ad agency, where the director presented—there was a ceremony of sorts— flowers to every woman in the office. It was the one day of the year when Russian women were allowed to put their feet up, when their husbands did some of the housework.

ecantwell:

Robert Montgomery, Scottish street artist.

The workshopper in me wondered for a moment if “always” was necessary. Yes, it is.

ecantwell:

Robert Montgomery, Scottish street artist.

The workshopper in me wondered for a moment if “always” was necessary. Yes, it is.

Ernest Ibbetsonlithograph, 1912
Someone please start this band.

Ernest Ibbetson
lithograph, 1912

Someone please start this band.

Ringing in 2012 Around the World:

A woman wrote with a sparkler the number 2012 in the air near St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, Austria.
Georg Hochmuth/European Pressphoto Agency

Ringing in 2012 Around the World:

A woman wrote with a sparkler the number 2012 in the air near St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, Austria.

Georg Hochmuth/European Pressphoto Agency

Ferdinand Schröder’s caricature of the defeat of the revolutions of 1848Düsseldorfer Monatshefte, August 1849 [Wikipedia]
In The Guardian, John Harris compares this year with 1989, 1968, and 1848. Gary Sick is inclined toward 1848—when most of the threatened institutions retained the means to remain largely intact.

Ferdinand Schröder’s caricature of the defeat of the revolutions of 1848
Düsseldorfer Monatshefte, August 1849 [Wikipedia]

In The Guardian, John Harris compares this year with 1989, 1968, and 1848. Gary Sick is inclined toward 1848—when most of the threatened institutions retained the means to remain largely intact.

somethingchanged:

The things they don’t teach you in art school | Frieze

I feel the same way about writing, so fortunate to be able to spend my time with words, so intent on making something of it.

somethingchanged:

The things they don’t teach you in art school | Frieze

I feel the same way about writing, so fortunate to be able to spend my time with words, so intent on making something of it.