Sarah Wrote That

My story in the New Yorker*…page layout
*April Fools

My story in the New Yorker*…page layout

*April Fools

Seinfeld # 119, "The Sponge":

ELAINE (warns): She’s gonna ask how you got her number.JERRY: Oh, I’ll tell her I met some guy who knew her and he gave it to me.ELAINE: What’s he look like?JERRY: I really didn’t pay much attention, I’d just come from buying a speedboat.ELAINE: You’re buying a speedboat?JERRY: See, we’re already off the subject of how I got her number. (Elaine laughs.) All I gotta do is get past the first phone call and I’m home free.ELAINE: I don’t know about that.

Not only reissued today, but 30% off.

Seinfeld # 119, "The Sponge":

ELAINE (warns): She’s gonna ask how you got her number.
JERRY: Oh, I’ll tell her I met some guy who knew her and he gave it to me.
ELAINE: What’s he look like?
JERRY: I really didn’t pay much attention, I’d just come from buying a speedboat.
ELAINE: You’re buying a speedboat?
JERRY: See, we’re already off the subject of how I got her number. (Elaine laughs.) All I gotta do is get past the first phone call and I’m home free.
ELAINE: I don’t know about that.

Not only reissued today, but 30% off.

edithwithgooglyeyes:



“He doesn’t need help at all. Do you?”



I’m starting to root for Edith.

edithwithgooglyeyes:

“He doesn’t need help at all. Do you?”

I’m starting to root for Edith.

President Obama’s remarks to the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Dinner
October 18, 2012

Khan: “I’ve given you no word to keep.”
This, of course, right before Kirk fires back.
[Star Trek II quotes on IMDB]

Khan: “I’ve given you no word to keep.”

This, of course, right before Kirk fires back.

[Star Trek II quotes on IMDB]

The New Yorker, December 11, 2000

The New Yorker, December 11, 2000

romcom2012:


An eccentric billionaire sets out to find himself on a summer vacation with his family, his station wagon and his dog Seamus tied to the roof.

romcom2012:

An eccentric billionaire sets out to find himself on a summer vacation with his family, his station wagon and his dog Seamus tied to the roof.

Full Romney (noun, colloquial)

/fo͝ol rämnē/

Series of statements by a politician, reverting from a position taken for political advantage to a previous, opposite position, now often held by an opponent, with a subsequent reversal, sometimes termed “clarification,” to the now intermediate position of perceived advantage.

Variations include a partial or half Romney, which lacks defined opposition except the politician’s previous statements, and a reverse Romney, in which the politician denies any difference between the various positions.

Instances have been recorded of grand Romneys, when accumulated full and partial Romneys preclude determination of any broader political philosophy.

“Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.”

Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.”